At Work & Economics 101 & Public Square & Theology 101

IFWE’s Top 10 Blog Posts of 2013

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2013 was the year of myth-busting here on the IFWE blog. Jay Richards’s examination of the eight most common myths Christians believe about wealth, poverty, and free enterprise was our most viewed post of the year. Gabrielle Jackson debunked five myths about the millennial worker, too. But that’s not all.

These are the top ten posts that received the most attention, from you, our readers. Enjoy taking a look back on all 2013 had to offer. Thanks for being an interested, involved, and engaging audience. See you in 2014!

The Eight Most Common Myths about Wealth, Poverty, and Free Enterprise

What does God require of us as Christians? Doesn’t capitalism foster unfair competition? Has Christianity ever really embraced capitalism? These are just a few of the questions Jay Richards takes on when he debunks the eight most common myths about wealth, poverty, and free enterprise.

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Five Myths about the Millennial Worker

Lazy, entitled, and delusional? Or passionate, conscientious, and innovative? As a new generation of workers enters the workforce, they are bringing new ideas and values into the workplace. How do Christian employers avoid stereotypes and conflict in order to leverage the interests and talents of all their employees? Gabrielle Jackson addresses some of these issues by taking a hard look at some of the myths about today’s young workers.

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Are Spiritual Gifts Intended for My Work?

In order to know how to best serve God, be successful, and make a difference, it’s important to discern what your spiritual gifts are. Learn about the three ways that the Holy Spirit works in the world, as well as what the Bible has to say about the work of the Spirit in the Old Testament. How can we discern our own gifts and how they apply to our work?

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Joel Salatin on Work and Stewardship

As a self-labeled, “Christian-libertarian-environmentalist-capitalist-lunatic-farmer,” Joel Salatin breaks all stereotypes and provides a unique perspective on faith, farming, and economics. Learn about how he views his farming as a form of stewardship in which he can heal the earth. How do his environmental convictions complement his belief in the market economy? Is it possible to promote human flourishing while making a profit?

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A Missionary with a Mind for Economics

Does Haiti need more missionaries? Mark Aubrey would say no. In fact, he would say that some missionary efforts are harming Haiti’s potential to grow. Aubrey is a missionary to Haiti who cares deeply about business, economics—and basketball. What Haiti really needs, he says, are more Haitian business leaders and entrepreneurs, along with mentors who can offer them help and support.

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Joel Salatin on Forgiveness Farming and Redemptive Work

Can farming teach us anything about redemption and forgiveness? According to Joel Salatin, it can. While inanimate objects can’t forgive, living things can. Creation can inform us about spiritual truths, so Salatin seeks to reflect Christ’s restorative power through his work as a farmer. Learn about how he seeks to reverse effects of the Fall through his preparation for floods and droughts, honors the way God created each species, and recognizes that all life requires sacrifice.

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What the Bible Says about Government

With so many conflicting opinions about government, what are Christians supposed to believe? Dr. Art Lindsley looks for the answer in Scripture and explores four key principles about what government is supposed to do, how large it should be, and how Christians can respond to authority.

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How to Find Your Calling

With so many career options available to us in the midst of such a difficult economic climate, how exactly are we supposed to find our calling? What if we don’t know what we are good at or what motivates us? Elise Amyx points out that calling is not something you discover; it’s something you recognize. And with that, she takes us on a three-step journey that can guide us in that process of recognition. All you need is an hour, a confidant, a pen, and a piece of paper.

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Four Essential Elements of Economic Progress

We all want to see economic progress, but how do we achieve it? Anne Bradley wades through all of the conflicting economic advice out there to pull out four essential elements of economic development. Learn what these elements are and how we can use them to help bring about prosperity for more people.

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Five Christian Traits Every Entrepreneur Needs

Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? Is it possible for your faith to inform the way you do business? Brian Baugus takes a look at five biblical traits that Christians value: vision, faith, perseverance, sacrifice, and service. Learn why these qualities are also crucial to entrepreneurs and how successful people leverage them.

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