At Work & Economics 101 & Public Square & Theology 101

‘Flourishing Faith’: A Primer on Faith, Work, and Economics That Will Help You Grow in Discipleship

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If you’re looking for resources to help you build a robust framework for Christian stewardship, Flourishing Faith, a primer on faith, work and economics published by the Acton Institute, is a great place to start.

Chad Brand, an IFWE senior research fellow and professor of Christian theology at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, wrote Flourishing Faith and hopes it encourages Christians to view work and economics as essential elements of Christian discipleship.

In an interview with Southern Resources, an online magazine associated with SBTS, Brand shares the vision of work put forth in the book:

Luther’s idea of vocation, that the Puritans and later Baptists picked up: everyone has a calling. You should find out what that calling is and pursue that calling. Realize that God doesn’t just put his stamp of approval on the “sacred” callings, but on all callings. Because all of life is lived, Luther said, coram deo, in the face of God.

In the book itself he writes:

The Scriptures elevate human labor of all kinds to a laudable, fulfilling, and God-honoring calling. Although the church has not always seen work as occupying an important place in life, the Reformers and Puritans in keeping with Scripture made it clear that all people have a calling and that all believers are priests unto the Lord.

Writing about the need for Brand’s book, Christian’s Library Press, the publisher behind the primer, says,

Most pastors, professors, and parishioners simply don’t connect work, economics, and God’s plan for making us into mature disciples. Evangelicals need a big-picture perspective on the fact that God made us, in part, to work. Plus, all legitimate work glorifies God and through its fruitfulness blesses countless others. So how do politics, economics, and citizenship responsibilities fit into a broader discipleship model of life stewardship?

Acton has also published three other primers answering this question from the perspective of different Christian traditions (Brand’s book focuses on the Baptist tradition):

  • Economic Shalom dives into faith, work, and flourishing from a Reformed perspective.

Acton is offering you a chance to win all four books this week. Be sure to check out these great resources to further your knowledge and understanding of faith, work, and economics.

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  • Bruce Ross

    As a person entering my “Senior” years, I look back and see how little the subject of vocation was (and is now) discussed in the church. I hope to look back at what God has done in my life through my career of choice and bless my children and grandchildren with this knowledge. Love this website. Blessings to you!

    • gregoryayers

      Thanks for sharing, Bruce. We’re working to help bring vocation back into the discussions taking place in church, and we’re glad to hear you’re doing the same with your children and grandchildren. Let us know what other topics related to this subject you’d find interesting and helpful!

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