Theology 101

Here’s What the Biblical View of Freedom Means for Your Life

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We’ve been looking at the biblical view of freedom in the Old Testament and in the New Testament over the last few weeks. We’ve also looked at alternatives to the biblical view of freedom.

Here are some implications from what we have observed.

1. Freedom is not autonomy or doing what you feel like doing without any constraints.

2. Freedom involves structure. Bondage to Christ allows us to be free to be what we are created to be.

3. Freedom is within the context of Law. We are not under the obedience to the Law as a condition of salvation, but the moral Law and Christ’s commands give us a guide to know how to live and to love.

4. We are truly free when we know the truth about ourselves and the world. This means throwing off the lies and deceptions to which we are so often captive.

5. Salvation is not primarily political liberation (as in some theologies). But God often intervened when his people were oppressed by unjust totalitarian leaders (See examples in Exodus, Judges, for instance).

6. Inner renewal often leads to outer consequences and renewal of the land.

7. The Bible doesn’t prescribe one type of government, but freedom (political, economic, and religious) is consistent with the Bible, not contradictory to it.

8. Inner freedom inevitably drives toward outer freedom. You can have political (economic and religious) freedom and still be in bondage to sin. You can have inner freedom in an oppressed situation. But inner and outer freedoms are the most ideal state for human beings (Micah 4:4).

With this background in mind, it is not surprising that freedom has become a cry for many people that are believers.

The Declaration of Independence sets forth our God-given rights to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

We have seen the cries for freedom that led to pulling down the wall between East and West Berlin.

Believers should be the most free to enjoy life and God’s creation, as long as it is within the structure of how God has made us. We are not free from God-ordained obligations, but we are free to live life as God intended it to be lived.

This post has been adapted from Dr. Lindsley’s new article, “The Biblical View of Freedom.” Get your copy here

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  • tami_miller

    I don’t have time to write much right now except to say, Wow, thank you for speaking “my language” on the topic of freedom. So many believers are NOT living in the freedom that God ordained for them to have and has given us so abundantly. I grew up in this kind of almost legalistic environment and at the age of 45 Ithe pieces are finally starting to come together understanding the words of our Lord, “I have come that you may have life and have it more abundantly.”. Thank you for these words of truth and liberation!

  • tami_miller

    I don’t have time to write much right now except to say, Wow, thank you for speaking “my language” on the topic of freedom. So many believers are NOT living in the freedom that God ordained for them to have and has given us so abundantly. I grew up in this kind of almost legalistic environment and at the age of 45 Ithe pieces are finally starting to come together understanding the words of our Lord, “I have come that you may have life and have it more abundantly.”. Thank you for these words of truth and liberation!

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